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BY Dr. Sherif Abdel Azeem

The difference between the Biblical and the Quranic attitude towards the female sex starts as soon as a female is born. For example, the Bible states that the period of the mother's ritual impurity is twice as long if a girl is born than if a boy is (Lev. 12:2-5). The Catholic Bible states explicitly that:

"The birth of a daughter is a loss" (Ecclesiasticus 22:3).

In contrast to this shocking statement, boys receive special praise:

"A man who educates his son will be the envy of his enemy." (Ecclesiasticus 30:3)

Jewish Rabbis made it an obligation on Jewish men to produce offspring in order to propagate the race. At the same time, they did not hide their clear preference for male children : "It is well for those whose children are male but ill for those whose are female", "At the birth of a boy, all are joyful...at the birth of a girl all are sorrowful", and "When a boy comes into the world, peace comes into the world... When a girl comes, nothing comes."7

A daughter is considered a painful burden, a potential source of shame to her father:

"Your daughter is headstrong? Keep a sharp look-out that she does not make you the laughing stock of your enemies, the talk of the town, the object of common gossip, and put you to public shame" (Ecclesiasticus 42:11).

"Keep a headstrong daughter under firm control, or she will abuse any indulgence she receives. Keep a strict watch on her shameless eye, do not be surprised if she disgraces you" (Ecclesiasticus 26:10-11).

It was this very same idea of treating daughters as sources of shame that led the pagan Arabs, before the advent of Islam, to practice female infanticide. The Quran severely condemned this heinous practice:

"When news is brought to one of them of the birth of a female child, his face darkens and he is filled with inward grief. With shame does he hide himself from his people because of the bad news he has had! Shall he retain her on contempt or bury her in the dust? Ah! what an evil they decide on?" (16:59).

It has to be mentioned that this sinister crime would have never stopped in Arabia were it not for the power of the scathing terms the Quran used to condemn this practice (16:59, 43:17, 81:8-9). The Quran, moreover, makes no distinction between boys and girls. In contrast to the Bible, the Quran considers the birth of a female as a gift and a blessing from God, the same as the birth of a male. The Quran even mentions the gift of the female birth first:

" To Allah belongs the dominion of the heavens and the earth. He creates what He wills. He bestows female children to whomever He wills and bestows male children to whomever He wills" (42:49).

In order to wipe out all the traces of female infanticide in the nascent Muslim society, Prophet Muhammad promised those who were blessed with daughters of a great reward if they would bring them up kindly:

"He who is involved in bringing up daughters, and accords benevolent treatment towards them, they will be protection for him against Hell-Fire" (Bukhari and Muslim).

"Whoever maintains two girls till they attain maturity, he and I will come on the Resurrection Day like this; and he joined his fingers" (Muslim).

 

NOTES

 

1. The Globe and Mail, Oct. 4,1994.

 

2. Leonard J. Swidler, Women in Judaism: the Status of Women in Formative Judaism (Metuchen, N.J: Scarecrow Press, 1976) p. 115.

 

3. Thena Kendath, "Memories of an Orthodox youth" in Susannah Heschel, ed. On being a Jewish Feminist (New York: Schocken Books, 1983), pp. 96-97.

 

4. Swidler, op. cit., pp. 80-81.

 

5. Rosemary R. Ruether, "Christianity", in Arvind Sharma, ed., Women in World Religions (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1987) p. 209.

 

6. For all the sayings of the prominent Saints, see Karen Armstrong, The Gospel According to Woman (London: Elm Tree Books, 1986) pp. 52-62. See also Nancy van Vuuren, The Subversion of Women as Practiced by Churches, Witch-Hunters, and Other Sexists (Philadelphia: Westminister Press) pp. 28-30.

 

7. Swidler, op. cit., p. 140.

 

8. Denise L. Carmody, "Judaism", in Arvind Sharma, ed., op. cit., p. 197.

 

9. Swidler, op. cit., p. 137.

 

10. Ibid., p. 138.

 

11. Sally Priesand, Judaism and the New Woman (New York: Behrman House, Inc., 1975) p. 24.

 

12. Swidler, op. cit., p. 115.

 

13. Lesley Hazleton, Israeli Women The Reality Behind the Myths (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1977) p. 41.

 

14. Gage, op. cit. p. 142.

 

15. Jeffrey H. Togay, "Adultery," Encyclopaedia Judaica, Vol. II, col. 313. Also, see Judith Plaskow, Standing Again at Sinai: Judaism from a Feminist Perspective (New York: Harper & Row Publishers, 1990) pp. 170-177.

 

16. Hazleton, op. cit., pp. 41-42.

 

17. Swidler, op. cit., p. 141.

 

18. Matilda J. Gage, Woman, Church, and State (New York: Truth Seeker Company, 1893) p. 141.

 

19. Louis M. Epstein, The Jewish Marriage Contract (New York: Arno Press, 1973) p. 149.

 

20. Swidler, op. cit., p. 142.

 

21. Epstein, op. cit., pp. 164-165.

 

22. Ibid., pp. 112-113. See also Priesand, op. cit., p. 15.

 

23. James A. Brundage, Law, Sex, and Christian Society in Medieval Europe ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987) p. 88.

 

24. Ibid., p. 480.

 

25. R. Thompson, Women in Stuart England and America (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1974) p. 162.

 

26. Mary Murray, The Law of the Father (London: Routledge, 1995) p. 67.

 

27. Gage, op. cit., p. 143.

 

28. For example, see Jeffrey Lang, Struggling to Surrender, (Beltsville, MD: Amana Publications, 1994) p. 167.

 

29. Elsayyed Sabiq, Fiqh al Sunnah (Cairo: Darul Fatah lile'lam Al-Arabi, 11th edition, 1994), vol. 2, pp. 218-229.

 

30. Abdel-Haleem Abu Shuqqa, Tahreer al Mar'aa fi Asr al Risala (Kuwait: Dar al Qalam, 1990) pp. 109-112.

 

31. Leila Badawi, "Islam", in Jean Holm and John Bowker, ed., Women in Religion (London: Pinter Publishers, 1994) p. 102.

 

32. Amir H. Siddiqi, Studies in Islamic History (Karachi: Jamiyatul Falah Publications, 3rd edition, 1967) p. 138.

 

33. Epstein, op. cit., p. 196.

 

34. Swidler, op. cit., pp. 162-163.

 

35. The Toronto Star, Apr. 8, 1995.

 

36. Sabiq, op. cit., pp. 318-329. See also Muhammad al Ghazali, Qadaya al Mar'aa bin al Taqaleed al Rakida wal Wafida (Cairo: Dar al Shorooq, 4th edition, 1992) pp. 178-180.

 

37. Ibid., pp. 313-318.

 

38. David W. Amram, The Jewish Law of Divorce According to Bible and Talmud ( Philadelphia: Edward Stern & CO., Inc., 1896) pp. 125-126.

 

39. Epstein, op. cit., p. 219.

 

40. Ibid, pp 156-157.

 

41. Muhammad Abu Zahra, Usbu al Fiqh al Islami (Cairo: al Majlis al A'la li Ri'ayat al Funun, 1963) p. 66.

 

42. Epstein, op. cit., p. 122.

 

43. Armstrong, op. cit., p. 8.

 

44. Epstein, op. cit., p. 175.

 

45. Ibid., p. 121.

 

46. Gage, op. cit., p. 142.

 

47. B. Aisha Lemu and Fatima Heeren, Woman in Islam (London: Islamic Foundation, 1978) p. 23.

 

48. Hazleton, op. cit., pp. 45-46.

 

49. Ibid., p. 47.

 

50. Ibid., p. 49.

 

51. Swidler, op. cit., pp. 144-148.

 

52. Hazleton, op. cit., pp 44-45.

 

53. Eugene Hillman, Polygamy Reconsidered: African Plural Marriage and the Christian Churches (New York: Orbis Books, 1975) p. 140.

 

54. Ibid., p. 17.

 

55. Ibid., pp. 88-93.

 

56. Ibid., pp. 92-97.

 

57. Philip L. Kilbride, Plural Marriage For Our Times (Westport, Conn.: Bergin & Garvey, 1994) pp. 108-109.

 

58. The Weekly Review, Aug. 1, 1987.

 

59. Kilbride, op. cit., p. 126.

 

60. John D'Emilio and Estelle B. Freedman, Intimate Matters: A history of Sexuality in America (New York: Harper & Row Publishers, 1988) p. 87.

 

61. Ute Frevert, Women in German History: from Bourgeois Emancipation to Sexual Liberation (New York: Berg Publishers, 1988) pp. 263-264.

 

62. Ibid., pp. 257-258.

 

63. Sabiq, op. cit., p. 191.

 

64. Hillman, op. cit., p. 12.

 

65. Nathan Hare and Julie Hare, ed., Crisis in Black Sexual Politics (San Francisco: Black Think Tank, 1989) p. 25.

 

66. Ibid., p. 26.

 

67. Kilbride, op. cit., p. 94.

 

68. Ibid., p. 95.

 

69. Ibid.

 

70. Ibid., pp. 95-99.

 

71. Ibid., p. 118.

 

72. Lang, op. cit., p. 172.

 

73. Kilbride, op. cit., pp. 72-73.

 

74. Sabiq, op. cit., pp. 187-188.

 

75. Abdul Rahman Doi, Woman in Shari'ah (London: Ta-Ha Publishers, 1994) p. 76.

 

76. Menachem M. Brayer, The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature: A Psychosocial Perspective (Hoboken, N.J: Ktav Publishing House, 1986) p. 239.

 

77. Ibid., pp. 316-317. Also see Swidler, op. cit., pp. 121-123.

 

78. Ibid., p. 139.

 

79. Susan W. Schneider, Jewish and Female (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1984) p. 237.

 

80. Ibid., pp. 238-239.

 

81. Alexandra Wright, "Judaism", in Holm and Bowker, ed., op. cit., pp. 128-129

 

82. Clara M. Henning, "Cannon Law and the Battle of the Sexes" in Rosemary R. Ruether, ed., Religion and Sexism: Images of Woman in the Jewish and Christian Traditions (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1974) p. 272.

 

83. Donald B. Kraybill, The riddle of the Amish Culture (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989) p. 56.

 

84. Khalil Gibran, Thoughts and Meditations (New York: Bantam Books, 1960) p. 28.

 

85. The Times, Nov. 18, 1993.

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