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BY Dr. Sherif Abdel Azeem

The difference between the Biblical and the Quranic conceptions of women is not limited to the newly born female, it extends far beyond that. Let us compare their attitudes towards a female trying to learn her religion. The heart of Judaism is the Torah, the law. However, according to the Talmud, "women are exempt from the study of the Torah." Some Jewish Rabbis firmly declared "Let the words of Torah rather be destroyed by fire than imparted to women", and "Whoever teaches his daughter Torah is as though he taught her obscenity"8

The attitude of St. Paul in the New Testament is not brighter:

"As in all the congregations of the saints, women should remain silent in the churches. They are not allowed to speak, but must be in submission as the law says. If they want to inquire about something, they should ask their own husbands at home; for it is disgraceful for a woman to speak in the church." (I Corinthians 14:34-35)

How can a woman learn if she is not allowed to speak? How can a woman grow intellectually if she is obliged to be in a state of full submission? How can she broaden her horizons if her one and only source of information is her husband at home?

Now, to be fair, we should ask: is the Quranic position any different? One short story narrated in the Quran sums its position up concisely. Khawlah was a Muslim woman whose husband Aws pronounced this statement at a moment of anger: "You are to me as the back of my mother." This was held by pagan Arabs to be a statement of divorce which freed the husband from any conjugal responsibility but did not leave the wife free to leave the husband's home or to marry another man. Having heard these words from her husband, Khawlah was in a miserable situation. She went straight to the Prophet of Islam to plead her case. The Prophet was of the opinion that she should be patient since there seemed to be no way out. Khawla kept arguing with the Prophet in an attempt to save her suspended marriage. Shortly, the Quran intervened; Khawla's plea was accepted. The divine verdict abolished this iniquitous custom. One full chapter (Chapter 58) of the Quran whose title is "Almujadilah" or "The woman who is arguing" was named after this incident:

"Allah has heard and accepted the statement of the woman who pleads with you (the Prophet) concerning her husband and carries her complaint to Allah, and Allah hears the arguments between both of you for Allah hears and sees all things...." (58:1).

A woman in the Quranic conception has the right to argue even with the Prophet of Islam himself. No one has the right to instruct her to be silent. She is under no obligation to consider her husband the one and only reference in matters of law and religion.

NOTES

1. The Globe and Mail, Oct. 4,1994.

2. Leonard J. Swidler, Women in Judaism: the Status of Women in Formative Judaism (Metuchen, N.J: Scarecrow Press, 1976) p. 115.

 

3. Thena Kendath, "Memories of an Orthodox youth" in Susannah Heschel, ed. On being a Jewish Feminist (New York: Schocken Books, 1983), pp. 96-97.

 

4. Swidler, op. cit., pp. 80-81.

 

5. Rosemary R. Ruether, "Christianity", in Arvind Sharma, ed., Women in World Religions (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1987) p. 209.

 

6. For all the sayings of the prominent Saints, see Karen Armstrong, The Gospel According to Woman (London: Elm Tree Books, 1986) pp. 52-62. See also Nancy van Vuuren, The Subversion of Women as Practiced by Churches, Witch-Hunters, and Other Sexists (Philadelphia: Westminister Press) pp. 28-30.

 

7. Swidler, op. cit., p. 140.

 

8. Denise L. Carmody, "Judaism", in Arvind Sharma, ed., op. cit., p. 197.

 

9. Swidler, op. cit., p. 137.

 

10. Ibid., p. 138.

 

11. Sally Priesand, Judaism and the New Woman (New York: Behrman House, Inc., 1975) p. 24.

 

12. Swidler, op. cit., p. 115.

 

13. Lesley Hazleton, Israeli Women The Reality Behind the Myths (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1977) p. 41.

 

14. Gage, op. cit. p. 142.

 

15. Jeffrey H. Togay, "Adultery," Encyclopaedia Judaica, Vol. II, col. 313. Also, see Judith Plaskow, Standing Again at Sinai: Judaism from a Feminist Perspective (New York: Harper & Row Publishers, 1990) pp. 170-177.

 

16. Hazleton, op. cit., pp. 41-42.

 

17. Swidler, op. cit., p. 141.

 

18. Matilda J. Gage, Woman, Church, and State (New York: Truth Seeker Company, 1893) p. 141.

 

19. Louis M. Epstein, The Jewish Marriage Contract (New York: Arno Press, 1973) p. 149.

 

20. Swidler, op. cit., p. 142.

 

21. Epstein, op. cit., pp. 164-165.

 

22. Ibid., pp. 112-113. See also Priesand, op. cit., p. 15.

 

23. James A. Brundage, Law, Sex, and Christian Society in Medieval Europe ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987) p. 88.

 

24. Ibid., p. 480.

 

25. R. Thompson, Women in Stuart England and America (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1974) p. 162.

 

26. Mary Murray, The Law of the Father (London: Routledge, 1995) p. 67.

 

27. Gage, op. cit., p. 143.

 

28. For example, see Jeffrey Lang, Struggling to Surrender, (Beltsville, MD: Amana Publications, 1994) p. 167.

 

29. Elsayyed Sabiq, Fiqh al Sunnah (Cairo: Darul Fatah lile'lam Al-Arabi, 11th edition, 1994), vol. 2, pp. 218-229.

 

30. Abdel-Haleem Abu Shuqqa, Tahreer al Mar'aa fi Asr al Risala (Kuwait: Dar al Qalam, 1990) pp. 109-112.

 

31. Leila Badawi, "Islam", in Jean Holm and John Bowker, ed., Women in Religion (London: Pinter Publishers, 1994) p. 102.

 

32. Amir H. Siddiqi, Studies in Islamic History (Karachi: Jamiyatul Falah Publications, 3rd edition, 1967) p. 138.

 

33. Epstein, op. cit., p. 196.

 

34. Swidler, op. cit., pp. 162-163.

 

35. The Toronto Star, Apr. 8, 1995.

 

36. Sabiq, op. cit., pp. 318-329. See also Muhammad al Ghazali, Qadaya al Mar'aa bin al Taqaleed al Rakida wal Wafida (Cairo: Dar al Shorooq, 4th edition, 1992) pp. 178-180.

 

37. Ibid., pp. 313-318.

 

38. David W. Amram, The Jewish Law of Divorce According to Bible and Talmud ( Philadelphia: Edward Stern & CO., Inc., 1896) pp. 125-126.

 

39. Epstein, op. cit., p. 219.

 

40. Ibid, pp 156-157.

 

41. Muhammad Abu Zahra, Usbu al Fiqh al Islami (Cairo: al Majlis al A'la li Ri'ayat al Funun, 1963) p. 66.

 

42. Epstein, op. cit., p. 122.

 

43. Armstrong, op. cit., p. 8.

 

44. Epstein, op. cit., p. 175.

 

45. Ibid., p. 121.

 

46. Gage, op. cit., p. 142.

 

47. B. Aisha Lemu and Fatima Heeren, Woman in Islam (London: Islamic Foundation, 1978) p. 23.

 

48. Hazleton, op. cit., pp. 45-46.

 

49. Ibid., p. 47.

 

50. Ibid., p. 49.

 

51. Swidler, op. cit., pp. 144-148.

 

52. Hazleton, op. cit., pp 44-45.

 

53. Eugene Hillman, Polygamy Reconsidered: African Plural Marriage and the Christian Churches (New York: Orbis Books, 1975) p. 140.

 

54. Ibid., p. 17.

 

55. Ibid., pp. 88-93.

 

56. Ibid., pp. 92-97.

 

57. Philip L. Kilbride, Plural Marriage For Our Times (Westport, Conn.: Bergin & Garvey, 1994) pp. 108-109.

 

58. The Weekly Review, Aug. 1, 1987.

 

59. Kilbride, op. cit., p. 126.

 

60. John D'Emilio and Estelle B. Freedman, Intimate Matters: A history of Sexuality in America (New York: Harper & Row Publishers, 1988) p. 87.

 

61. Ute Frevert, Women in German History: from Bourgeois Emancipation to Sexual Liberation (New York: Berg Publishers, 1988) pp. 263-264.

 

62. Ibid., pp. 257-258.

 

63. Sabiq, op. cit., p. 191.

 

64. Hillman, op. cit., p. 12.

 

65. Nathan Hare and Julie Hare, ed., Crisis in Black Sexual Politics (San Francisco: Black Think Tank, 1989) p. 25.

 

66. Ibid., p. 26.

 

67. Kilbride, op. cit., p. 94.

 

68. Ibid., p. 95.

 

69. Ibid.

 

70. Ibid., pp. 95-99.

 

71. Ibid., p. 118.

 

72. Lang, op. cit., p. 172.

 

73. Kilbride, op. cit., pp. 72-73.

 

74. Sabiq, op. cit., pp. 187-188.

 

75. Abdul Rahman Doi, Woman in Shari'ah (London: Ta-Ha Publishers, 1994) p. 76.

 

76. Menachem M. Brayer, The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature: A Psychosocial Perspective (Hoboken, N.J: Ktav Publishing House, 1986) p. 239.

 

77. Ibid., pp. 316-317. Also see Swidler, op. cit., pp. 121-123.

 

78. Ibid., p. 139.

 

79. Susan W. Schneider, Jewish and Female (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1984) p. 237.

 

80. Ibid., pp. 238-239.

 

81. Alexandra Wright, "Judaism", in Holm and Bowker, ed., op. cit., pp. 128-129

 

82. Clara M. Henning, "Cannon Law and the Battle of the Sexes" in Rosemary R. Ruether, ed., Religion and Sexism: Images of Woman in the Jewish and Christian Traditions (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1974) p. 272.

 

83. Donald B. Kraybill, The riddle of the Amish Culture (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989) p. 56.

 

84. Khalil Gibran, Thoughts and Meditations (New York: Bantam Books, 1960) p. 28.

 

85. The Times, Nov. 18, 1993.

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