HIJAB IN THE WORKPLACE

Below is a question/answer format for the topic of hijab at work.

Q. What are the requirements for Muslim women's dress?

         A: Rules regarding Muslim women's (and men's) attire are derived from
              the Quran, Islam's revealed text, and the traditions (hadith) of the
              Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him). In the Quran, God states: "Say to
              the believing men that they should lower their gaze and guard their
              modesty...And say to the believing women that they should lower their
              gaze and guard their modesty; that they should not display their beauty
              and adornments except what (must ordinarily) appear thereof; that they
              should draw their veils over their bosoms and not display their beauty
              except to their husbands, their fathers...(a list of exceptions)"
              [Chapter 24, verses 30-31] Also, "O Prophet! Tell thy wives and
              daughters, and the believing women, that they should cast their outer
              garments over their persons...that they should be known and not
              molested." [Chapter 33, verse 59]

 

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Elijah and a Blind Man

`In the time of the prophet Elijah it came to pass that Elijah seeing a blind man weeping, a man of good life, asked him, saying: "Why weepest thou, O brother?" The blind man answered: "I weep because I cannot see Elijah the prophet, the holy one of God."

`Then Elijah rebuked him, saying: "Cease from weeping,  O man, for in weeping thou sinnest."

`The blind man answered: "Now tell me, is it a sin to see a holy prophet of God, that raiseth the dead and maketh the fire to come down from heaven?"

`Elijah answered: "Thou speakest not the truth, for Elijah is not able to do anything of all that thou sayest, because he is a man as thou art. For all the men in the world cannot make one fly to be born."

`Said the blind man: "Thou sayest this, O man, because Elijah must have rebuked thee for some sin of thine, wherefore thou hatest him."

`Elijah answered: "May it please God that thou be speaking the truth: because, O brother, if I should hate Elijah I should love God, and the more I should hate Elijah the more I should love God."

`Hereupon was the blind man greatly angered, and said: "As God liveth, thou art an impious fellow! Can God then be loved while one hateth the prophets of God? Begone forthwith, for I will not listen to thee any longer!"

`Elijah answered: "Brother, now mayest thou see with thine intellect how evil is bodily seeing. For thou desirest sight to see Elijah, and hatest Elijah with thy soul."

`The blind man answered: "Now begone! For thou art the devil, that wouldst make me sin against the holy one of God."

`Then Elijah gave a sigh, and said with tears: "Thou hast spoken the truth, O brother, for my flesh, which thou desirest to see, separateth thee from God."

`Said the blind man: "I do not wish to see thee; nay, if I had my eyes, I would close them so as not to see thee?"

`Then said Elijah: "Know, brother, that I am Elijah!"

`The blind man answered: "Thou speakest not the truth."

`Then said the disciples of Elijah: "Brother, he verily is the prophet of God, Elijah."

`"Let him tell," said the blind man, "if he be the prophet, of what seed I am, and how I became blind?'

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Jihad Explained

 In the linguistic sense, the Arabic word "jihad" means struggling or striving and applies to any effort exerted by anyone. In this sense, a student struggles and strives to get an education and pass course work; an employee strives to fulfill his/her job and maintain good relations with his/her employer; a politician strives to maintain or increase his popularity with his constituents and so on. The term strive or struggle may be used for/by Muslims as well as non-Muslims; for example, Allah, the One and Only True God says in the Qur'an:

"We have enjoined on people kindness to parents; but if they STRIVE (JAHADAKA) to make you ascribe partners with Me that of which you have no knowledge, then obey them not..." (29:8; also see 31:15)

In the above two verses of the Qur'an , it is non-Muslim parents who strive (jahadaka) to convert their Muslim child back to their religion. In the West, "jihad" is generally translated as "holy war," a usage the media has popularized. According to Islamic teachings, it is UNHOLY to instigate or start war; however, some wars are inevitable and justifiable. If we translate the words "holy war" back into Arabic, we find "harbun muqaddasatu," or for "the holy war," "al-harbu al-muqaddasatu." WE CHALLENGE any researcher or scholar to find the meaning of "jihad" as holy war in the Qur'an or authentic Hadith collections or in early Islamic literature. Unfortunately, some Muslim writers and translators of the Qur'an, the Hadith and other Islamic literature translate the term "jihad" as "holy war," due to the influence of centuries-old Western propaganda. This could be a reflection of the Christian use of the term "Holy War" to refer to the Crusades of a thousand years ago. However, the Arabic words for "war" are "harb" or "qital," which are found in the Qur'an and Hadith.

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Attributes of Allah

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Hajj - The Pilgrimage

Islamic Caligraphy

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Islamic Architecture

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Natural Beauty

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